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Complete Guide - Essential Oils for Your Pet.

Essential-oils-for-cats-dogs

I'm sure you already know about the benefits of essential oils. In fact, you may use essential oils frequently to help with problems such as anxiety and stress but some of the less known issues they can be used for, include their strong anti-inflammatory, antibacterial and antiviral properties. Whilst the healing power of essential oils is well known for human health, less people are aware of the healing power these oils can have for our pets. The great thing is, that once you know how to safely and properly use essential oils, it's a huge eye opener into what they can achieve for the health, wellness and support of our animals.

The really awesome thing about essential oils is, that they work in supporting the body physically, emotionally, mentally and spiritually. They can also be used with great success instead of resorting to pharmaceutical medicines, which can cause adverse effects. This is because a pharmaceutical drug contains only one or a few of the many bioactive constituents found in an essential oil. Whereas the essential oil itself contains a complete range of bioactive constituents, making it very stable. Why don't you test it out for yourself; the next time you've got a headache try inhaling peppermint oil and putting a little on your temples and the back of your neck instead of reaching for the paracetamol. You'll be amazed at how well it works and as a double bonus, your liver will be smiling too at not having to break down the chemicals found in the drug. Nature is pretty awesome, eh!

I've been using essential oils with my pets for a number of years to treat things such as anxiety, introducing a new pet into the household and as a natural flea treatment application. Check out our pet oil products here. But if you want to go the DIY route, where do you start? 

Firstly, and importantly, did you know that not all oils are not created equally? Also, what can be used on you can't necessarily be used on your pet. Added to this, extra care is needed when using oils on either a cat or a dog as they have VERY different sensitivities and results will vary if you're applying them topically, for ingestion, inhalation or with a diffuser. 

When using essential oils to improve wellness, you must make sure that the oil is of therapeutic quality; synthetic, adulterated or diluted essential oils do not offer the same healing power and can be more harmful. There is actually NO official governing body that regulates and certifies the grade of oils the industry uses. So be very wary of the term "pure" as extracts could be distilled from a poorly harvested crop, be exposed to cross contamination in production or have been oxidised by age and these reduce the overall quality of what we're lead to believe through as "pure".

There are numerous varieties of oils out there as they occur naturally within a plant; seeds, leaves, bark, roots or flowers. The makeup of the oils change not only from plant to plant, but through weather conditions, location, season and even when grown and harvested. 

As Dr Robert Pappas President and Technical Director at the Essential Oil University, specialists in the production, chemistry and quality of essential oils says, "while many companies promote their own therapeutic grade standard, one should be aware that there is no universally accepted independent body that certifies essential oils as therapeutic grade." For more detailed information, check out his page https://www.facebook.com/EssentialOilUniversity/


So, what do you need to look out for when choosing an essential oil? What is the difference between a high quality grade oil and a low quality grade oil?

When choosing an essential oil for your pet (and yourself!), Dr Melissa Shelton (holistic and integrative veterinarian and specialist in essential oils) recommends you go for oils that are both "naturally produced and of a medical grade quality". 

Some of the highest grade oils, are those that are certified organic essential oils. That are free of pesticides and chemicals and are tested frequently at independent laboratories for their medical application and quality.

Low grade oils are those that are synthetic or altered oils, basically laboratory and chemically produced. They are not sourced from natural extracts and can be both toxic and detrimental to your pet's health and well-being, even to yours.

When buying essential oils make sure to check out the company's reputation, if their oils are reputable and if they check the quality of their oils regularly. A quick tick list is to make sure the Latin name is included on the labelling, the country of origin, how they've been produced and that the oil is pet friendly.

Essential oils compounds are very powerful and even tiny amounts can have a big impact on every level of the body. Take into account your pet's needs, life of your pet and size as they are smaller than us so oils may need to be used in much smaller quantities. And with their super sense of smell, pets will be able to smell the oil from the unopened bottle.

If you're applying topically, make sure you avoid all the sensitive areas on your pet such as the eyes, nose and genital areas and make sure your dog REALLY does want the oil applied topically.

Cats should NEVER make direct contact with an essential oil so use these via inhalation only.

If not given correctly, oils can be extremely toxic or over use can cause sensitivities even through inhalation A good simple guide is, if your pet resists in any way to the oil, then stop using it and always make sure your pet can get to un-diffused air at any time. Speak to your vet about which oils to use, how to apply them and those that will work with your pet.

If your pet does have a topical application of essential oil and does not want this on them then DO NOT use water to wipe this off. Essential oils are hydrophobic, meaning they repel from water and will seep further in to the skin of your pet. Instead, to wipe away an essential oil you need to use a liquid that has a fat content itself, such as yogurt, milk or butter. Being lipophilic (liking fat) the essential oil will absorb into the fatty liquid being used to wipe the area clean.


If they're potentially toxic, why use them?

Like anything we put into or on our body, overuse, abuse and not using common sense can cause major issues.

Essential oils are a fantastic natural alternative or support to pharmaceutical drugs. They are what tribal people have been using for thousands of years to heal themselves, way before pharmaceutical drugs were even available. As naturopathic healthcare once again becomes more common and more evidence is becoming available about this practice the vet world is realising that essential oils are incredibly effective at treating and promoting healing. This is because they work at a cellular level, supporting the balance of, increasing or decreasing the vibrational frequency of the pet to return it to normal function. Many essential oils have a bidirectional effect, meaning they can raise or lower the vibrational frequency of the individual animal to regain balance at the physical, mental, emotional or spiritual level.

Essential oils are a much cheaper solution than pharmaceutical drugs and more importantly, have less side effects. Certain leading holistic vets are breaking new ground with treating illnesses in animals that have been classed as untreatable through common pharmaceutical drugs. Basically, essential oils are incredible!

One of the greatest benefits of using and working with essential oils is as Dr Becker (integrative veterinarian) nicely summed up in her article on "Essential Oils for Pets",

"The beauty of essential oils is plants change, and so every single distillation of essential oils is slightly different from its predecessor. This is a benefit we don't receive from pharmaceutical drugs. Every batch of a medical drug must by law be identical to the batch that preceded it.

Plants, on the other hand, adapt and change with the tiniest variable in their environment, for example, a change in the water supply. So essential oils, created from ever-adapting plants, never reach a point where pathogens become resistant to them. They stay at least one step ahead – which makes them much smarter than anything we can create in a laboratory". 

Wow! What can be better than that - Mother Nature, giving us everything we need to protect our wellness and that of our pets!!!


Do essential oils actually help?

As long as you have a good understanding of essential oils and how to use them, or as long as you are working with a veterinarian or animal professional who is qualified in using essential oils for animals, then in short, yes! However, to steal the words of holistic vet Randy Kidd, "All medicine works…some of the time…in some animals." 

There are numerous therapies available today that can improve the wellness of your pet and essential oils are just one of them. Powerful they are and life-changing they can be, but a cure all they are not. When using essential oils to improve health, we must also choose to adopt an holistic approach to wellness otherwise you can run the risk of cancelling out any good that the oils are doing; looking in to the diet, exercise, environment and stress of your pet need to be considered also. Sometimes, it does no harm to "power up" the healing effect of the oils by using other therapies along side, such as massage, acupuncture, nutrition etc. 

The examples of how essential oils alone have supported pets (and other animals) across the globe is staggering; anything from speeding up the healing process of cuts and wounds to destroying life threatening diseases in an individual, such as cancer. There are examples of pets receiving pain relief, digestive support, improved appetite, incontinence, skin irritations, ear infections, cancers, internal bleeding, bacterial and viral infections, diarrhoea, noise phobias, trauma, aggression and fear, anxiety, hormone balance, pregnancy and birthing to name but a few. If your pet has a problem, whether physical, emotional or otherwise it really is worth considering how essential oils can support and improve your pet in returning it back to normal health.


Dr Isla Fishburn applying an essential oil topically on a dog who has an ear infection. (Only apply topically under the instruction of a professional or if you are experienced in using essential oils).



Which, where, how? - Essential oils to get you started that can be used on both your cat and dog.

You must make sure that the essential oil you are using is of therapeutic quality. What typically guarantees this is if the oil is certified as organic, but be sure to check with the company. Never be fooled by cheap essential oils, they are usually tampered with in some way, making the oil ineffective and even possibly dangerous to use for healing purposes. In addition, an essential oil should always state its Latin name on the bottle so that you can be sure you are buying the right one (different regions may use the same English name for different plants). If you are not sure about what a certain oil should cost, find several companies that sell the essential oil and compare prices. Those priced at the higher end are likely to be therapeutic. If you are still not sure then ask the professional you are working with. 

A cat should only ever be allowed to inhale an essential oil. Topical application or ingestion should be avoided. With dogs, all three routes can be used; inhalation, topical or ingestion, but NEVER add an essential oil to a dog's food or to items such as a collar or bed, unless you have been instructed to do so or unless the dog can move away from it if/when the oil is no longer needed.

In addition, NEVER apply an essential oil topically unless the dog appears to want it applied via this route of application. Often, you will see a dog sniff the essential oil and either move a body part closer to you that they want the essential oil applied on, or point with their muzzle to where they want it applied. Sometimes, a dog is less obvious and whilst a dog may be asking for the oil to be applied topically, you may have to work slower to observe where the dog wants it applied. Slow and steady observation is the key here, a slight movement or change in the body can be an indication. Your pet must ALWAYS be able to walk away from an essential oil and have access to another room or part of the house if they do not want to be near the essential oil. 

If a dog wants to ingest an essential oil, then the dog will usually lick it, but allow this to be the dog's choice. If a dog wants to inhale the oil, they may move their nose to and from the bottle as they vary the distance they wish to work with the aroma; sometimes what appears to be a dog uninterested in the oil is actually the opposite, but the oil may be too close so the dog is adjusting the distance it would like to work with the essential oil. A dog may inhale an essential oil, move off and lie down. This is a sign that the dog is working with the oil. Other responses include the dog lying next to the essential oil and going in to a deep trance, falling asleep, blinking lots or closing eyes tight, yawning, gulping, whining, drooling, licking or changing its breathing rhythm.

There are many essential oils that may improve and support your pet's wellness but there are too many to list them all here. However, below you can find a few of the more commonly used essential oils to provide health benefits for your pet, but note there are many more, which may better suit your pet than those listed here. It is worth noting that given the many bioactive constituents present in just one essential oil (e.g. yarrow has over 50 different chemical compounds) it is widely agreed that an essential oil provides health benefits of which we know nothing about. Sometimes your pet will want an essential oil for reasons we don't understand.


Essential oils for stomach support.

Ginger (Zingiber officinale). This oil not only provides anti-inflammatory support (see pain list) but can also aid in digestive issues and calm the stomach, especially where there may be nausea. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats. 

Peppermint (Mentha piperita). Peppermint can provide several health benefits. One of these is to provide support for the stomach, where there is discomfort and needs a soothing effect. If your pet is suffering with nerve pain DO NOT apply peppermint topically as peppermint excites neurons and can intensify nerve pain. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare). Fennel can support the stomach where there are muscular cramps, pains and provides a soothing effect to the smooth stomach muscles. It also stimulates digestion. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Black Pepper (Piper nigrum). As well as being a great oil for soothing muscular aches and pains, black pepper can also provide digestive support for the stomach. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.


Essential oils for inflammation/Pain.

Black Pepper (Piper nigrum). This oil can provide as a muscle rub and soothes aching muscles. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats. Your dog may wish to have black pepper applied topically on an area that is strained, bruised or aching. 

Peppermint (Mentha piperita). Peppermint can be used to stimulate nerve endings that are causing numbness. It can also provide anti-inflammatory effects and soothe burns. If your pet is suffering with nerve pain DO NOT apply peppermint topically as peppermint excites neurons and can intensify nerve pain. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Ginger (Zingiber officinale). Ginger has anti-inflammatory properties that can soothe your pet if s/he has aches or discomfort. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Yarrow (Achillea millefolium). As well as having properties that can support your pet's emotional imbalances, Yarrow provides relief and support on burns and wounds. It also provides pain relief at much deeper levels of the body (e.g. tissue damage). This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

German Chamomile (Matricaria recutita). German Chamomile is similar to Yarrow in its support for relieving pain. It is also very good for soothing the skin or where there are other dermal irritations. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

There are some other essential oils that can have great anti-inflammatory effects. However, they are very potent and if used incorrectly may seriously hurt your pet. For this reason, they are not listed here.


A dog inhaling black pepper essential oil. That can support aches, sprains and inflammatory discomfort.


Essential oils for bacterial.

Thyme (Thymus vulgaris). Thyme is a very strong immune-stimulant, meaning it supports the immune system. It is also very good as an anti-bacterial. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Lemon (Citrus limon). This essential oil serves several health benefits. Not only can it support a dog emotionally but it is also an immune-stimulant and strong antibacterial. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats. This oil is photo-reactive, meaning it reacts in sunlight. Only apply topically if you are guided by a professional to do so. 

Bergamot (Citrus bergamia). Not only is this essential oil good for skin conditions but it is also an effective anti-bacterial. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats. This oil is photo-reactive, meaning it reacts in sunlight. Only apply topically if you are guided by a professional to do so.

There are some other essential oils that can have great anti-bacterial effects. However, they are very potent and if used incorrectly may seriously hurt your pet. For this reason, they are not listed here.


Essential oils for calming.

Roman Chamomile (Anthemis nobilis). This oil provides a calming action for pets that are suffering with anxious or nervous behaviours, or for those animals who are consumed with worry. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Hops (Humulus lupulus). Hops can be an effective oil to help calm an animal who is anxious, nervous, or where irritability might be seen in your pet. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Valerian Root (Valeriana officinalis). Valerian root is a relaxant and mild sedative. It offers calming and soothing support for your pet where there is anxiety, panic or tension. 

Nutmeg (Myristica fragrans). Nutmeg can help to ground an animal who is anxious, hyperactive and where their energy is scattered. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Lavender (Lavandula angustifolia). Amongst its several uses, lavender can be used to sooth and comfort an animal who is suffering with distress and/or anxiety. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.


Essential oils for fear.

Frankincense (Boswellia carterii). On its own, or with the support of other essential oils that help reduce emotions of fear in an animal, Frankincense can help distance an animal where there is stress and commotion. It can support a pet who is showing fear, on many levels and where a dog may be breathing heavily as a result of fear related issues. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Violet Leaf (Viola odorata). If an animal is shocked or showing hesitancy/wariness then violet leaf can support an animal who is expecting to see, hear, smell or be exposed to a bad experience. It can support an animal who is nervous and provides comfort and reassurance. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Linden Blossom (Tilia cordata). On its own, or with the support of other essential oils that can help a fearful animal, Linden blossom can provide a sense of feeling of trust and safety. It can support an animal who is fearful and who has suffered abuse. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Sandalwood (Santalum austrocaledonicum). As well as providing support at a physical level, Sandalwood can support animals who also have emotional imbalances, particularly where there is worry and uncertainty. It can be very effective on its own, or in combination with other essential oils. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.


A dog who has a fear of children working with sandalwood and linden blossom essential oil, before falling asleep with these next to him.


Essential oils for skin.

Yarrow (Achillea millefolium). As well as having properties that can support your pet's emotional imbalances, Yarrow provides relief and support for skin issues and irritations. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

German Chamomile (Matricaria recutita). German Chamomile is similar to Yarrow in its support for the skin. It is also very good for soothing the skin or where there are other dermal irritations, including dermatitis or inflamed skin. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Peppermint (Mentha piperita). Peppermint can cool and soothe skin that is hot, itchy and irritated. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.


Essential oils for aggression.

Rose Otto (Rosa damascena). Rose Otto provides deep emotional support for animals that have been subject to suffering, trauma and/or neglect. It can sometimes be used to remove unwanted aggression that the animal displays. Rose Otto can often be a difficult essential oil for an abused, neglected or terrified animal to work with and it also comes with a caution; an animal may release unwanted negative behaviours when using Rose Otto, meaning an animal may react negatively and aggressively before positive results are seen. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Vetiver (Chrysopogon zizanioides). Vetiver provides comfort and reassurance for an axious pet who may show aggression or where an animal is showing aggression through assertive behaviours towards another individual. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Vanilla (Vanilla planifolia). This essential oil has comforting and nurturing qualities for an animal that has nervous tension or where the animal is displaying irritability and anger. Animals that have been known to bite can often use it or try and bite when they become irritated or angry. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Clary Sage (Salvia sclarea). Often used for female animals, it can also be used for males that show anger, mood swings and frustration. It provides relaxing, calming and soothing effects. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Yarrow (Achillea millefolium). Along with its ability to heal physical imbalances, yarrow can work on its own or in combination with other oils to support an animal who has emotional imbalances through being over-sensitive or being at the hands of neglect and abuse. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.


Essential oils for cancer.

Seaweed (Fucus vesiculosus). Seaweed has many uses on the physical level pertaining to disease and infection. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Carrot Seed (Daucus carota). This oil has huge healing potential where an animal is very unwell. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.
Lemon (Citrus limon). Among its many healing properties along the physical level, Lemon essential oil can be effective in limiting the growth of cancer. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Frankincense (Boswellia carterii). Amongst its ability to support an animal suffering with emotional imbalances, Frankincense can provide pain relief specific to pain that is being caused by tumours. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Ginger (Zingiber officinale). It is suggested that ginger can support a dog who has cancer, but this may be to provide support of feeling of nausea that the illness or medication may be causing. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

There are some other essential oils that can have great effects on killing cancer cells. However, they are very potent and if used incorrectly may seriously hurt your pet. For this reason, they are not listed here.


A dog with cancer relaxing as it inhales lemon essential oil.


Essential oils for loneliness/sadness.

Neroli (Citrus aurantium). On its own or alongside Mimosa, this can often be a difficult essential oil for an animal to accept. It can offer support for an animal who is suffering with depression or has deep loss, sadness or loneliness. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Mimosa (Acacia decurrens). On its own or alongside Neroli, Mimosa offers feelings of comfort and support where an animal has been subject to loss and/or separation. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

Peppermint (Mentha piperita). This oil has a calming effect and can help ease anxiety associated with, or a consequence of loneliness or sadness. This oil can be inhaled, ingested or applied topically on your dog (only if your dog selects its use); inhalation only for cats.

These are just some of the basic oils you can use to help your pet's well-being. There are some other essential oils that can have great healing effects, but they are very potent and if used incorrectly and may seriously hurt your pet. For this reason, they are not listed here. 

Remember essential oils are very powerful so it's essential the oil you buy, is a high grade and preferably organic. Work with you pet, read his body language and importantly protect your beloved cat by only letting them inhale the oil never apply them topically.

NOW, we know we've covered a lot but we'd love to have YOUR feedback on your experience of using essential oils with your pets or if you've decided to give them a try. LEAVE A COMMENT and feel free to share this with people you think will love it.


Natural lifestyle, naturally health, naturally thriving!!

Disclaimer: The entire contents of this website and articles are based on the opinions of the people at Authentica. The information contained within is not intended to replace that of your qualified vets or intended as medical advice. We are sharing knowledge and information but in no way should this pertain you from seeking proper professional medical/veterinary advice. We encourage you to do your own research and make your own decisions on your pet's health in conjunction with your vet. Neither we nor any third parties provide any warranty or guarantee as to the accuracy of information. You acknowledge that such information and materials may contain inaccuracies or errors. Your use of any information or materials on this website is entirely at your own risk, for which we shall not be liable. It shall be your own responsibility to ensure that any products, services or information available through this website meet your specific requirements and those of your pet. If you become aware of any material on the website that you believe infringes your or any other person's copyright, please report this by email to info@authenticapets.com so we can immediately rectify the issue.


Resources:
http://www.dogsnaturallymagazine.com/essential-oils-for-pets/
http://healthypets.mercola.com/sites/healthypets/archive/2016/01/17/animaleo-essential-oils.aspx
http://doterra.com/US/en
http://www.weedemandreap.com/essential-oils-dogs/
www.oilyvets.com
https://draxe.com/section/natural-remedies/
http://www.aromaweb.com/articles/howtobuyessentialoils.asp
https://www.facebook.com/EssentialOilUniversity/
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/richard-palmquist-dvm/pet-aromatherapy_b_877199.html

 

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Disclaimer: The entire contents of this website and articles are based on the opinions of the people at Authentica. The information contained within is not intended to replace that of your qualified vets or intended as medical advice. We are sharing knowledge and information but in no way should this pertain you from seeking proper professional medical/veterinary advice. We encourage you to do your own research and make your own decisions on your pet's health in conjunction with your vet. Neither we nor any third parties provide any warranty or guarantee as to the accuracy of information. You acknowledge that such information and materials may contain inaccuracies or errors. Your use of any information or materials on this website is entirely at your own risk, for which we shall not be liable. It shall be your own responsibility to ensure that any products, services or information available through this website meet your specific requirements and those of your pet. If you become aware of any material on the website that you believe infringes your or any other person's copyright, please report this by email to info@authenticapets.com so we can immediately rectify the issue.

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