fbpx

SHOPPING CART

The cart is empty

ACCOUNT

Account
Please wait, authorizing ...
Not a member? Sign up now
×

Discover 12 simple steps to improving your pet's well-being.
plus, we’ll send you fortnightly advice to support your pet’s health.

Search Blog Publications

Raw Feeding Myths

Myths-Raw-Feeding

There is often a lot of debate around raw feeding. Mainly, is it safe, that processed pet food is the best, that raw feeding isn't suited to domesticated pets etc. So we've asked Dr Nick to help answer some of the more common myths we come across around raw feeding.

(For those of you not already familiar with Dr Nick and know he's the bee's knees, he is a fully trained vet with over 30 years of experience. He is trained in homeopathy, acupuncture, natural nutrition and veterinary herbal medicine. He has special interests in immunology, internal medicine in all species and Autism spectrum behaviour in dogs and horses).

If we apply common sense for a moment, we know that as humans we can't live a healthy lifestyle by eating processed foods alone so you have to question why we've all been convinced that a fully processed diet is suitable for our pets especially given scientific evidence proving that both a cat's and dog's digestive system hasn't been altered by evolution.

Quality of food is important, both for us humans and for our pets. Medical evidence today suggests direct links between certain diseases and the consumption of certain foods in both humans and pets i.e. diabetes. Added to this, is the link between healthy eating and the longevity of life, again in both humans and pets.

One of the biggest observations we come across here in Argentina is both vet's and pet owner's mentality towards the age of pets. A dog of 12 and still living is considered almost a miracle and when they do happen to sadly pass away it's classed as "well, it was old you couldn't expect more" 

Yet, there are cats and dogs still living and fighting fit at the age of 21. Only this year an Australian dog named Maggie died at the age 30. Different factors come into play but one of the fundamentals to look at is overall nourishment. 

Here at Authentica, we believe pets should live long healthy lives that's why we use first grade human quality food, organic and non-gmo ingredients in our products.


Myth 1: Dogs Are Omnivores.

Dogs are, depending on whom you read, facultative carnivores. This means they can forage for berries, herbivore faeces, vegetables and other non-prey items, but essentially they need animal protein and fat in order to maintain optimum health. The only people who maintain that dogs are omnivores are pet food manufacturers selling high cereal foods!


Myth 2: Dogs Are Too Far Removed from Wolves or Wild Dogs.

The only truth in this statement is that we have changed dogs significantly. But we have changed mostly only their appearance and temperament, not their anatomy and physiology. 

Feldhamer, in his 1999 book Mammalogy: Adaptation, Diversity, and Ecology states, "The domestic dog is an extremely close relative of the gray wolf, differing from it by at most 0.2% of mDNA sequence. He goes on to say, "the domestic dog is, by all scientific standards and by evolutionary history, a domesticated wolf".


Myth 3: Dogs Have Been Domesticated So Long They Have Adapted to Cooked Diets.

Indeed dogs were domesticated thousands of years ago and then selectively bred for desired sizes, shapes and characteristics. Axelsson in his 2013 letter to Nature titled 'The genomic signature of dog domestication reveals adaptation to a starch-rich diet', has found 36 genomic regions where domesticated dogs differ from their wolf cousins. Interestingly, 10 of these are associated with starch digestion, suggesting there was digestive selection pressure on early domestic dogs. This is a lone paper and still does not justify, in my mind, the feeding of high cereal processed foods to a facultative carnivore.


Myth 4: Dogs Are Living Longer Lives Because of the Better Nutrition Provided by Kibble.

Dogs' longevity has only recently been determined by 'research' performed by the pet food companies. They use these estimates to "show" that their food helps animals live longer. But longer compared to what? No one cared about canine longevity in the earlier days (except the select few concerned with breeding canines), so no one kept records or performed surveys.

If pets are living longer, then why are they being considered "old" at younger and younger ages? A dog is now a 'senior' by the age of 7 or 8; some even say a dog is "old" at 5 or 6. Cats are considered seniors by the ripe old age of 7 (tell that to raw fed cats still going strong at the age of 20!). In recent years Golden Retrievers and Flat-coated Retrievers, to name but a few breeds, are known to be less long lived. Processed food is thought by many to be contributory to this shortening of life. Recent claims by certain manufacturers that their foods extend life have been disproven.

The oldest dog ever recorded was 30 years old; Maggie the Australian farm dog in who only recently died and ate fresh food and raw milk throughout her long life! Rodney Habib found her when he was lecturing out there and you can find more details on his website: http://www.planetpaws.ca/


Myth 5: Only Commercial Diets Provide Perfectly Balanced Meals.

This is propaganda perpetuated by pet food companies. They can only produce fixed recipes because that's the nature of industrial food. Rather than let this be a limitation (and it is a limitation as every individual needs slightly different nutritional needs), their publicists turned it into a strength and called it 'scientifically formulated' or 'complete and balanced'. Raw food feeding, if given with variety to your dog or cat allows them to determine what nutrients will be absorbed and when, just as they have for hundreds of thousands of years.


Myth 6: Salmonella in Raw Meat Will Hurt My Pet & Me.

It's important to note that salmonella can be found in up to 30 percent of all healthy dogs and 18 percent of healthy cats regardless of the food they consume. Many pets harbour these bacteria as a part of their normal GI flora and naturally shed salmonella organisms in faeces and saliva whether raw or processed food fed.

All non-typhoid salmonella species are ubiquitously present in the environment and reside in the GI tracts of many animals, including pets. Some human salmonellosis cases are acquired through ingestion or handling of contaminated dry pet foods and treats – not raw meat! I know of no incidence of human beings being infected with salmonella by raw-fed cats and dogs and basic hygiene should always be applied.


Myth 7: My Pet Will Acquire Worms from The Raw Meat in A Raw Diet.

Yes, there can be parasites in raw meat. But if you are getting meaty bones and carcasses from reputable companies or places producing meat fit for human consumption, the parasite factor is low. In addition, if meat is frozen for more than 14 days, then this risk is practically non-existent. Even if this risk was high most parasites are not a big issue and can be safely dealt with by your pet if it is healthy.


Myth 8: Raw Meat Will Make My Dog Bloodthirsty.

This is my favourite old wives tale that some people still repeat. It's interesting to note that herding breeds have coexisted peacefully with the animals they herded without savaging or killing them, even while these dogs were fed raw meat and bones from the very same kinds of animals they were guarding.

The dog is, by nature, a predator, and will chase other animals because it is hard-wired to do so, not because it is bloodthirsty or has a taste for meat in the human definition of the words.

Feeding raw will often actually have a general chill-out effect on dogs, especially after meals. Excess carbohydrate, as found in kibble, on the other hand, can cause all sorts of behavioural/psychological issues in dogs which is something to keep in mind.

Many owners spend a fortune on dog training when the behavioural issues can be sorted by elimination of processed carbohydrates (kibble) from a dog's diet.


Myth 9: Bones Are Dangerous and Have No Nutritional Value.

Indeed cooked bones can be very dangerous. Raw bones rarely cause dangerous splinters and are fully digestible with good stomach acid. Even the collagen proteins that some people claim are "indigestible." It is mostly the by-products of the digested bone that form the bulk of a raw-fed animal's faeces. Dogs and cats do not rely solely on the fibre from grains and vegetables.

Problems can occur with raw bones, just as problems can occur with feeding the "safer" kibble (bloating, choking, telescoping bowel, aspirated kibble leading to pneumonia, etc.). These problems typically occur in dogs that are fed inappropriately small bones which they cannot crush or large weight-bearing marrow bones of herbivores, things like knuckle bones, femurs, etc.

These, ironically, are the kinds of bones pet food manufacturers and some vets recommend dogs receive regularly to help keep teeth clean! These bones chip or break teeth in all but veteran raw fed dogs. If you don't feed raw bones, most dogs and cats will need dental procedures throughout their life to descale and polish good teeth and remove rotten ones; all involving a general anaesthetic.

Bones are nutritious, containing calcium, phosphorus, iron, selenium and a wealth of other minerals in a form that are more easily digestible even than mineral and vitamin preparations. They also contain cartilage, which, once digested, the body uses to repair and replace its own joints.


Myth 10: Home-Made, Cooked Diets Are a Better, Safer Alternative to Raw.

The act of cooking alters the proteins, vitamins, fats, and minerals in a food. This alteration can make some nutrients more readily available and others less available. Cooking can even alter fats to the point of being toxic and carcinogenic. Some dogs and cats, especially older animals or those with damaged guts may need cooked food to help digestion. The majority of our pets can thrive on a varied raw food diet.


NOW, we'd love to hear your feedback so LEAVE A COMMENT and feel free to share this with people you think will love it.


Natural lifestyle, naturally health, naturally thriving!!

Disclaimer: The entire contents of this website and articles are based on the opinions of the people at Authentica. The information contained within is not intended to replace that of your qualified vets or intended as medical advice. We are sharing knowledge and information but in no way should this pertain you from seeking proper professional medical/veterinary advice. We encourage you to do your own research and make your own decisions on your pet's health in conjunction with your vet. Neither we nor any third parties provide any warranty or guarantee as to the accuracy of information. You acknowledge that such information and materials may contain inaccuracies or errors. Your use of any information or materials on this website is entirely at your own risk, for which we shall not be liable. It shall be your own responsibility to ensure that any products, services or information available through this website meet your specific requirements and those of your pet. If you become aware of any material on the website that you believe infringes your or any other person's copyright, please report this by email to info@authenticapets.com so we can immediately rectify the issue.

Mitos de la Comida Cruda
National Dog Day
 

Comments

No comments made yet. Be the first to submit a comment
Already Registered? Login Here
Guest
Monday, April 06 2020
If you'd like to register, please fill in the username, password and name fields.

Disclaimer: The entire contents of this website and articles are based on the opinions of the people at Authentica. The information contained within is not intended to replace that of your qualified vets or intended as medical advice. We are sharing knowledge and information but in no way should this pertain you from seeking proper professional medical/veterinary advice. We encourage you to do your own research and make your own decisions on your pet's health in conjunction with your vet. Neither we nor any third parties provide any warranty or guarantee as to the accuracy of information. You acknowledge that such information and materials may contain inaccuracies or errors. Your use of any information or materials on this website is entirely at your own risk, for which we shall not be liable. It shall be your own responsibility to ensure that any products, services or information available through this website meet your specific requirements and those of your pet. If you become aware of any material on the website that you believe infringes your or any other person's copyright, please report this by email to info@authenticapets.com so we can immediately rectify the issue.

.

Sign up to our fortnightly newsletter for free pet health advice.

¿Te gusta? ¡Síganos!

No te arrepentirás...