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Warts On Dogs

warts-dog

Dogs warts are confusing. How do you make sure small lumps are warts? Lumps and bumps are concerning. Your dog looks to you for reassurance, focus on being calm. Your vet can quickly tell you if your dog has warts or what is known as papillomatosis. Canine warts look like miniature heads of pink cauliflower. Are they a tumour? Yes. The problem with canine warts is they vary in colour (pink, black, brown or grey) and texture so they look scary. 

Warts are common between near and inside mouths, hairy toes, eyes and armpits. Almost all warts are non-invasive but some can multiply quickly becoming invasive and painful. Often mistaken as warts, skin tags are more prevalent in older dogs which is the opposite of canine warts. 

Papillomas are more prevalent in younger dogs with immature immune systems. Skin tags are more apt to appear on the chest, neck and legs. Skin tags are known as "fibrous growths" and don't resemble a head of cauliflower, they can be any shape and usually hang or have flexible appendages.


Understanding the Origin of Warts 

Warts take a long time to develop sometimes over a period of months so it can be hard to trace the origin of infection if your dog has a busy lifestyle. Most warts are caused by a viral contagion and are common in dogs with low vitamin D levels, young dogs, dogs with compromised immune systems, or dogs who've had surgery. 

Some breeds like pugs can be more prone to getting warts. Spaniels, Weimerwiners, and Vislas are also more susceptible to papilomatosis. Wart viruses (yes there are more than one type) aren't transmitted from dog to human however, the virus can be transmitted from toys, bedding, and other dogs. Wash bedding, toys or anything touched by your dog as papillomas can spread quickly from dog to dog. Keep your dog out of dog parks, daycare or boarding facilities during an active episode.


Conventional Wart Treatment 

Warts can be scary in this age of cancer. Your vet is most likely good at recognizing warts and can ease your mind. While most warts don't cause any issues and go way on their own, some can bleed, itch or become infected. For example, eye and mouth warts can obstruct vision or make eating difficult. Surgical intervention might be needed. The standard of practice is freezing them off which is painless and an outpatient procedure. 


Holistic Wart Treatment 

The main goal of holistic treatment of canine warts isn't treatment, it's prevention. Supporting your dog's immune and lymphatic system can go a long way in keeping your dog from getting warts even if they're young. 

A fresh food diet and eliminating kibble is fundamental in supporting your dog's health`. Kibble diets contain toxins and lay stagnant in the digestive systems. Your dog's body spends too much time processing kibble instead of eliminating toxins or supporting their immune system. A healthy, whole food diet helps prevent disease, support the immune system and minimize inflammation

Make sure you're feeding an ample amount of pre and probiotics and clean filtered water and that your dogs are being properly exercised. Dogs should be getting at least 30 mins of outdoor activity a day. This can be running, walking, chasing a frisbee, fetching a ball or playing with other dogs. Outdoor air and running connect your dog to the earth's magnetic field which supports strong immune health including decreasing cortisol levels and inflammation. 

Minimise vaccinations and prescription drugs as much as possible. A less-is-more approach is important when it comes to these so you protect your dog's liver and immune system. Minimize unnecessary yearly vaccines and only use prescription drugs as a last resort. The more your dog processes pharmaceuticals, the less time they have for detoxification and proper metabolic function. Vaccine ingredients and prescription drugs are all processed by the liver. When the liver can't process accumulated wastes fast enough, toxins settle into your dog's tissues, which is why it's essential you help protect it by reducing your dog's exposure to synthetic products and ingredients.

When detoxing and healing, the liver almost always needs support so it doesn't get overworked. A strong liver makes for a stronger immune system. For almost all skin issues, the liver plays a role in recovery. Also, consider that you may need to do some vibrational healing. You and your dog share a vibration field. Stress plays a huge role in healing, and your dog is a sponge to your energy and emotions

When stressors are high, your vibrational field is in fight or flight (sympathetic excess). This response suppresses immune health delaying healing. When we are calm, we are able to digest and heal. Our dogs are extremely in tune with our stress levels and how we manage our emotional well-being. Healing happens in the parasympathetic nervous system state or the relaxed state. Practice breathing exercises with your dog, get some fresh air, meditate together or try practising animal reiki.


Herbs For Healing Warts 

Reishi Mushroom (Ganoderma Lucidum) 
Parts Used: fruiting bodies 
Powder Dosage: 125 mg for every 15 pounds / given twice daily with food 
Tincture Dosage: 1/2 ml for every 10 pounds / before feeding 

Turkey Tail Mushroom (Trametes Versicolor) 
Parts Used: mycelium and fruiting body 
Powder Dosage: 50 mg for every 15 pounds given three times daily 
Caution: Turkey tail is usually well tolerated but some digestive disturbances can occur with large dosages.

Calendula (Calendula officinalis) or Dandelion (Taraxcum officinale) stem sap 
Parts Used: Stem sap 
Preparations: External 
Dosage: Enough to cover the wart 

Calendula and dandelions properties make them excellent topically for helping reduce or eliminate warts. The ancient method still used today is applying the stem sap from these herbs and here's how. 

Break off a calendula or dandelion as close to the ground as possible. Gently squeeze sticky, milky sap from stem. Apply to cover the wart. Apply twice daily for at least 2 weeks or more. 

Notes: Dandelion sap may be irritating initially but the irritation stimulates the immune system which fights warts within.

Black Current (Ribes nigrum) Gemmotherapy 
Parts Used: Buds 
Preparations: internally or externally, mother (1:20) or diluted (1:200) homeopathic version 

Internal Dosage:
Gemmotherapy 1:200 dosage: extra small dogs: 8 drops, small dogs: 10 drops, medium dogs: 15 drops, large dogs: 20 drops extra large dogs: 30 drops given twice daily. 

Gemmotherapy 1:20 dosage: extra small dogs: 2 drops, small dogs: 4 drops, medium dogs: 5-8 drops, large dogs: 8-12 drops and extra-large dogs: 12-15 drops given twice daily. 

External/Topical Dosage: 10 drops gemmotherapy in 4 oz amber spray bottle, or dropper bottle, spray or drop on wart just enough to cover, apply 2x daily. 

Caution: Can be stimulating. Avoid using with dogs that have seizures. Avoid using for dogs with high cortisol levels. Signs of too much include heart palpitations in humans, restlessness, anxiety, focal seizure.

Dog Rose (Rosa canina) Gemmotherapy 
Parts Used: Buds 

Internal Dosages: 
Gemmotherapy 1:200 dosage: extra small dogs: 2-4 drops, small dogs: 4-6 drops, medium dogs: 6-8 drops, large dogs: 8-10 drops extra large dogs: 10-12 drops given twice daily. 

Gemmotherapy 1:20 dosage: extra small dogs 1-2 drops, small dogs 2-3 drops, medium drops 3-4 drops, large dogs 4-5 drops and extra-large dogs 5-6 drops given twice daily.

Willow (Salix alba vitellina) Gemmotherapy 
Parts Used: Buds 
Preparations: internally or externally, mother (1:20) or diluted (1:200) homoeopathic version 

Internal Dosages: 
Gemmotherapy 1:200 dosage: extra small dogs: 2-3 drops, small dogs: 3-4 drops, medium dogs: 4-6 drops, large dogs: 6-9 drops extra large dogs: 8-11 drops given twice daily. 

Gemmotherapy 1:20 dosage: extra small dogs diluted 1 drop-2 drops, small dogs 1-3 drops, medium drops 2-4 drops, large dogs 4-6 drops and extra-large dogs 7-9 drops given twice daily. 

External Dosage: 
10 drops gemmotherapy in 4 oz amber spray bottle, or dropper bottle, spray or drop on wart just enough to cover, apply 2x daily. 

Caution: Don't use if allergic to salicylic acid or aspirin. Don't mix with seizure medications. Don't use with Gout, Crohn's, or any autoimmune disease. Don't use with any bleeding disorders.


Homeopathic Solutions For Warts

Phytolacca decandra 12 C 

Dosage: 3 pellets 2x daily 

Thuja occidentalis 12 C 

Dosage: 3 pellets 2x daily at least 20 min away from food. For dog homoeopathic pellets, it's recommended you dissolve pellets in a tiny (2 ml or less) of water and syringe into the dog's mouth. 

Homeopathic Thuja Cream 

Thuja cream can eradicate papillomatous lesions. 

Dosage: Apply just enough to cover wart 2x daily for at least 4 weeks.



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Comments

Guest
Guest - Valerie Kulak on Friday, July 29 2022 19:18

I would love to know about the choice of phytolacca in your article for warts. I have never come across that. I see it in the materia medica but is not a common one that I have ever seen for warts! I am very interested in some insight into why this remedy was included. My dog has a wart on her eyelid. I have been treating with homeopathy with some success but it’s a journey. I’m missing something in my research of phytolacca for this.??

I would love to know about the choice of phytolacca in your article for warts. I have never come across that. I see it in the materia medica but is not a common one that I have ever seen for warts! I am very interested in some insight into why this remedy was included. My dog has a wart on her eyelid. I have been treating with homeopathy with some success but it’s a journey. I’m missing something in my research of phytolacca for this.??
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Wednesday, October 05 2022

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